Forums General Meniscus repair

  • This topic has 10 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 7 years ago by AvatarAndy Ainsworth.
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    • #70972
      AvatarAndy Ainsworth
      Participant

      I’m pretty sure I have minor damage to the lateral side of my meniscus on both knees, caused going knees out a bit to far on squats.
      What would be the suggestion for fixing it? Will voodoo flossing/ upstream/downstream work be effective or is it better to stop what’s causing it and let it heal on its own??

    • #74740

      pretty sure because you had an MRI?

      I think the mistake KStar made with knees out cue is he didn’t preference that you needed to make sure you had good ankle and hip mobility.  If other parts of your body are stiff they are going to hold you back in which case you are going to being hanging on tissue — pretty much pulling on something that is not moving which is not good.  The force has to go somewhere, and most likely its going to be your knee if you don’t have the right range of motion.
    • #74745
      AvatarAndy Ainsworth
      Participant

      I’ve not had an MRI but I’ve used mcmurrays test. I don’t thinks it too serious but I don’t want it to get any worse.

    • #74746
      AvatarAndy Ainsworth
      Participant

      I did think my ankle and hip mobility were pretty good but I guess not quite good enough!! 🙁

    • #74750
      AvatarKatie Hemphill
      Participant

      Hey Mark,

      If it’s minor damage to the outside of the meniscus, there is a chance it will heal up. That area has some blood supply. But if you’re in any position to get an MRI and know what’s up, I would. It might be a good idea to lay off of the deep/heavy squats for a while and spend some time opening up your hips and ankles in a way that doesn’t provoke any pain symptoms from the knee.
      I think another mistake K-star made with the “knees out” cue is that he took for granted that everyone would know their feet still have to remain on the floor, and that it doesn’t mean your knees HAVE to be outside of the feet. On that note, however, Kelly Starrett is certainly not the first person to say knees out. He didn’t invent the cue, he just uses it. Mark Rippetoe emphasizes that cue in Starting Strength, and no one is hating on him in that debate.
      Furthermore, to continue the tangent, anytime I watch people squat who are not deliberately trying to shove their knees out, the feet collapse, even if the knees are floating above the feet. The system just goes soft. The knees out cue makes a ton of sense, but certain individuals may need other cues to really grasp the concept.
    • #74752

      I think the trouble occurs when the feet are straight.  Ripp doesn’t emphasize feet straight.   Feet straight, knees out is expert level stuff.  I like Kstar’s new thing with duck out, but keep arch in foot.  

    • #74753
    • #74754
      AvatarAndy Ainsworth
      Participant

      Thanks for the help guys.

      I’ve always squated and tried to push
      my knees out but with feet pointing out slightly as per Rippetoe but the pictures in BASL show KStar feet forward knees way outside his feet.

      It’s the photos in the book that I think are the problem.
      I’m pretty sure my problem started after reading BASL and changing my squat position to feet forward knees outside of my feet.

      I’ll look into an MRI and lay off going heavy for now.

      What do you think about returning to my old squat stance and going light on the weight until the knees improve and I can improve my mobility?? old squat stance and going light on the weight until the knees improve and I can improve my mobility??

    • #74755

      I would take the conservative approach and not go even light.  Work on mobility and get an MRI.  make sure you are ok and get a real doc to see what is going on.

    • #74785
      AvatarKatie Hemphill
      Participant

      Hey Mark,

      If you’re going to give the old squat stance a go, make sure you’re not getting any pain symptoms (not only during the session, but in the night and day following).
      Also, be careful of how you interpret the pictures in BaSL. Both Kelly and Diane have exceptional hip and ankle mobility, and are able to achieve some extreme of range of motion at the bottom of a squat that allow them to stay very upright. It’s not about pushing your knees outside the feet, but rather pushing them outwards to create tension (as Rippetoe himself said in Starting Strength). Your knees may, however, track outside of your feet when your hip and ankle ROM reach that level and you’re training a more upright squat. This is, to some degree, a result of the knee tracking farther forward in these deep upright positions creating the visual effect of the knees being waaaaaaay out.
      A good rule of thumb is that your feet should always be fully planted on the floor. If you push your knees out too far (trying to look like the Leopard), your feet will peel up and you’ll end up squatting on the edge of your foot, which is a fault. I find it helpful to pair the knees-out cue with  “screw your feet into the floor” and “big toe down” to help emphasize that connection.
      That connection is key.
    • #74809
      AvatarAndy Ainsworth
      Participant

      Good points!! Thanks for the input!!

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