Forums General Parkour landing (forefoot) vs traditional landing (forefoot + Heel) from height

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    • #71765
      AvatarNiels Zachariassen
      Participant

      Hi 

      I was wondering if the MWOD team could give their thoughts on this research paper, which talks about a difference in landing techniques which seems to generate quite a significant difference of force on the body. I’ve seen jumping videos on here that relate to box jumping (going up) with the traditional forefoot and heel landing, but I haven’t seen anything in relation to jumping off of a height.


      Thanks
      Alex
    • #76859
      AvatarPatrick Thomas
      Participant

      Most no longer rebound when doing box jumps.
      Even in competition competitors will jump up and step down.
      There isn’t much time lost when doing jump up step down.

    • #76860
      AvatarNiels Zachariassen
      Participant

      My interest isn’t in box jumps themselves, but what this communities thoughts are around the 2 different landing techniques. I’m a traceur and thus practice the forefoot only style of landing, mixed with external rotation of the hips to generate torque, its an overall softer landing. Also, the ultimate goal of precision landings is to be able to land on very narrow objects like rails, which does not give you room to bring your heels down. For me, if you can do a landing without having your heels hit the ground and not have your knees and hips go all over the place, it means you have enough strength and control to be able to come off of that height safely, but as the research paper says towards the end, could there be a potential for injury over the long term? is there something missing in the bio-mechanics if you land only on your forefoot? Am I missing something with my theory?

    • #76862
      AvatarPatrick Thomas
      Participant

      Landing only on the forefoot leaves the calf contracted.
      You can counter the cumulative effect on the calf& feet by performing maintenance mobility work on your calves and feet following sessions.

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