Forums Lifting Extreme hip pain, sciatica, sitting all day, trying to powerlift

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    • #71646
      Otis ManousakosOtis Manousakos
      Participant

      Hello all, I am new here and hoping I could find some answers.

      About two years ago in college, I developed a tightness inside the front of my hips at the bottom of my squats. At first it was just tightness. Shortly after, it turned into a pinching pain, just at the bottom of a squat, or with internal rotation. I was working as an accountant sitting on my ass all day; that is when the issues really developed. My hips began aching and burning all day, with the pinching getting more painful at the bottom of my squat.

      I was able to squat 405 ass to grass about 8 months ago, until I had hernia surgery. Shortly after I recovered, I got sent to the police academy.

      They made us sit ALL day for ten hours. You weren’t allowed to move unless they tell you to.

      I developed sciatic pain in my right glute. My hips burn and ache all day, and I cannot do as much as an air squat without debilitating punching pain and sciatica in my glute. I can only assume it is from sitting all day.

      We didn’t exercise in the academy, but I regularly trained an average of 2 hours a day, 6 days a week. I’m unable to deadlift or squat at this point. I get pain in the front of my hip, clicking and snapping in the sides, and sciatic pain..

      I am now a police officer and out of the academy, so I am able to be active through the day, outside of the gym.

      I apologize for the lengthy post.

      Before my hernia surgery, I was squatting 405 and deadlifting 520, and now I’m too immobile to do those basic movements.

      The only other thing I could think of is hernia surgery, or the fact I am flat footed, but I was once able to do all these movements without this kind of pain, so I am convinced the sitting destroyed me.

      If anyone has any suggestions, please steer me in the right direction.

      I’ve been rolling out with a foam roller and rolling my glutes with a LAX Ball every single day. It provides relief, but as soon as I have to sit for a full day, the pain comes back, even worse.

    • #76470
      AvatarPat Patrick
      Participant

      I wish anyone had given you advice…I’m in the same boat.  Sitting has killed my low back and I have chronic pain. I started strength training several months ago to stabilize my core to help, but the muscle pulls and pain continue.


      I may not have the same condition, but thought I’d share some things I’ve been trying…maybe something will help you or someone else that comes across this post.
      Sitting causes me pain and I feel my hips “go out” whenever I get in my car to drive.  So, I’ve been working with that thought.  I just ordered Deskbound: Standing up in a Sitting World.  I’m trying some of the stuff in there and trying not to sit for longer than 15 minutes. Not sitting on couch anymore for tv time….rolling on balls against wall or on floor, on floor doing stretches, squatting, or sitting in different ways to work different muscles while watching my favorite shows now. 
      I’ve also taught myself about the muscles around the pelvis. Check out this guy on youtube.  It was really helpful to me to understand the muscles and how they work. I especially find the psoas/hip flexor stretch beneficial for my problem. I always stretch it now and do hip bridges before working out so my glutes can do their job and fire.     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0bUDzBo__A  and  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQcBRxvlVFY .

      Also, check out SI joint dysfunction. I’ve found several videos on how to release/adjust the si joint and half the time, I get a pop and some relief. Why sometimes and not others I’m wondering?  I started keeping notes to see if I can get a correlation to release – could it be related to stretching out first before doing this or not? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJeTqyybD00

      I’m also just starting an acupuncture series to see if it makes a difference. 

      Good luck with your issues. You are not alone. 

    • #76474
      Otis ManousakosOtis Manousakos
      Participant

      Thank you! The SI joint is something I haven’t looked at, much. My TFL and piriformis seem to need constant soft tissue work, which helps as well. I’m still playing with anything I can come across to see if it gives me relief. So far, they are still aching and hurting all day long. I’ll let you know of anything I come across that seems to help.

      Smashwerx on YouTube has some great videos on impingement that have definitely helped with some of the pain.

    • #76482
      AvatarPat Patrick
      Participant

      Awesome. Thanks for sharing this resource! I can’t wait to dig into it today.

      If you are on mobilitywod, you’ve probably already seen this video I found recently. http://www.mobilitywod.com/2013/05/spinal-faulttweak/  
      This video takes things I’ve learned on my own by searching and packages it well so it makes sense. He shows how to align the pelvis first and then explains all the muscles that are in lockdown to compensate for that…and how to release them all. 
    • #76483
      AvatarPatrick Thomas
      Participant

      Have you addressed your sitting position at all?
      When you need to sit for along time taking a short break every hour is key. Getting up walking to deliver something to another in your office is an example.

      Have you looked at your sitting position?
      Episodes which address the impact of sitting on your body.
      Why Sitting Wrecks Your Mad Hip Action
      Episode 276: MobilityWod Google Talk: Desk Bound
      Episode 251: High Skilled Sitting/Abdominal Bracing
      Episode 187: Death by Chair. How Much Do Actually Sit?
      Episode 91: Mobilize In the Position of Death by Chair
      Episode 88: Desk Athlete Hip Rescue
      Episode 15: You Must Defeat The Evil Chair Part 1
      Episode 15: You Must Defeat The Evil Chair Part 2

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