Forums Foot/Ankle Ankle Impingment with good foot positioning

  • This topic has 11 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 7 years ago by AvatarPAul Evans.
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    • #71077
      AvatarJustin Perz
      Participant

      I have been working on my ankles for a while. I have sprained each one a couple of times. My left ankle has responded really well to banded distractions. I am able to reach past the restriction and then attend to the calf muscle as the joint is opened up to further mobilize the calf. My right side, however, is not responding as well. I used to have flat feet. I have been working through rebuilding them and now have some arch and have been putting proper foot position and neutral sub-talar position at the top of my priority list. When my right foot is in a neutral position and I try to do banded distractions, I feel like I hit a wall. Then, when I try to mobilize my calf and Achilles, I get a pinch and I am restricted before I can put any tension on my calf or Achilles. This foot also turns out when I squat because it cannot get past that impingement. Is there anything I should be doing to clear the impingement. I have seen a few vids but I can’t seem to figure out what to do next.

    • #75137
      AvatarAnonymous

      Sounds like you may be missing internal rotation at the hip on the right side.
      Contributing factor to your foot turning out on that side.
      You hit a wall because you are at the limits of the positioning without more internal rotation at the hip.
      Episode 230: Squatting With Turned Out Feet? Hey Duck Squatter, IR Yourself.
      Episode 343: Stop Walking Like the Duck You Aren’t

    • #75139
      AvatarJustin Perz
      Participant

      But I am experiencing this impingement when I am trying to mobilize the calf and Achilles, like Kstar does in Episode three. I have the same amount of internal rotation on each leg, approximately 15 degrees.

    • #75147
      AvatarAnonymous

      You can experience the impingement when mobilizing the calf and achilles because you are at the end range limits of your positioning if it is not the ideal positioning. You can buffer variations in position for a time until you can’t anymore.
      Missing right hip IR can result in a tight ankle that wants to flare out. You see the impact down stream when addressing the calf and achilles

    • #75151
      AvatarJustin Perz
      Participant

      But I am not talking about when squatting only. I am talking about placing my foot against a wall and leaning forward and squeezing my glute. I get a great stretch on my left calf and Achilles but I hit an impingement on my right foot before I get any tension on the calf or Achilles. I can simulate the position on my left and right side and my left is fine but my right hits impingement. 

    • #75152
      AvatarAnonymous

      You are hitting the limits of your hip before there is any tension on the calf or achilles.
      Missing hip flexion affects spinal mechanics. When spinal mechanics are off there are issues at the big engines of the hip and shoulder.
      Full, unencumbered range of motion isn’t the goal, it’s the baseline.
      Episode 161: Hip Impingement: AIS
      Thursday, August 21st, 2014

    • #75199
      AvatarJustin Perz
      Participant

      But I am not talking about when squatting only. I am talking about placing my foot against a wall and leaning forward and squeezing my glute. I get a great stretch on my left calf and Achilles but I hit an impingement on my right foot before I get any tension on the calf or Achilles. I can simulate the position on my left and right side and my left is fine but my right hits impingement. 

    • #75201
      AvatarPAul Evans
      Participant

      I had the same problem as you describe. In my case it were bone spurs. My recommendation is to have a scan to see what is going on.

    • #75229
      AvatarNicholas Sadowski
      Participant

      http://www.mobilitywod.com/community/#/discussion/656


      I have the same issue as Jonathan describes, I got x-rays, and I DO have bone spurs… I asked for advice on whether to get them surgically removed in the link I posted (above), but I was discouraged from doing so, and end-range hip flexion mobs were recommended.  However, based on this video that was recommended to me (http://www.mobilitywod.com/daily/wednesday-august-21st-2013/), it looks like I really do just have ankle dorsiflexion issues, not hip issues.  I’m watching Kstar demonstrate at the beginning of the video what it would look like to be inhibited by hip flexion, and that is not what I’m feeling.  Like Jonathan mentioned, I’m not even trying to squat or get into a pistol.  I’m just doing some ankle flexion mobility tests – basic stuff.  I hit a wall.  Here’s my discussion I just created on the matter (http://www.mobilitywod.com/community/#/discussion/938/lots-of-peroneal-tendon-heel-cord-tension-).  I need help, too, and I feel like I have the same thing Jonathan has.

      Matti, did you have your bone spurs removed?
    • #75235
      AvatarPAul Evans
      Participant

      Yes two months ago, still not 100% after the op but hopefully soon I’ll be back training 100%

    • #75236

      Matti,

      Can you describe the healing process? How long were you out of work? Are you in the US?
    • #75240
      AvatarPAul Evans
      Participant

      I could stand on the leg pretty much straight away, maybe 2-3 days and was back in my office job a week after the op. I play football (soccer) and started training 6 weeks after but that was too soon so I am now only doing Crossfit where I focus on mobiltiy and stretching until I am able to start training again. I live in Iceland

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