Forums General Hip – Internal rotation Re: Hip – Internal rotation

#76086
AvatarNicholas Wathen
Participant

Hi Michael,

Hope the issue is solved. 

If not I think you
need to go back to iron_tiger’s post.  You have answered some of his
questions but you have dismissed a lot as well.  It’s one thing for YOU
yourself to have a look at your movement patterns, it’s another for a
trained professional.  Additionally, if you’ve been trying the same
thing with no results (ie. stretching external rotators and hip capsule)
then you’re probably looking in the wrong area. 

As many have
said it’s very difficult to treat your condition without seeing you in
person.  That includes myself.  However, to give you an idea of other
areas to look at, consider this article

http://deansomerset.com/side-plank-internal-rotation-question-answered/

Specifically
relating to the hip, this could be a centration issue where the body is
resisting forces acting to alter the joint position of the hip,
especially in a state where the glutes are less active than the
hamstrings or low back in hip extension based movements. If the femoral
head is consistently being pushed forward by the action of the
hamstrings on the joint, the internal rotation function of the psoas,
adductors, glutes as well as a bunch of others I can’t think of right
now, will be kicked up to resist further forward glide, and will
therefore reduce internal rotation through passive motion. – See more
at:
http://deansomerset.com/side-plank-internal-rotation-question-answered/#sthash.Hgokw1WH.dpuf

“Specifically
relating to the hip, this could be a centration issue where the body is
resisting forces to alter the joint position of the hip, especially in a
state where the glutes are less active than the hamstrings or low back
in hip extension movements.  If the femoral head is consistently being
pushed forward by the action of the hamstrings on the joint, the
internal rotation function of the psoas, adductors, glutes as well as a
bunch of others I can’t think of right now, will be kicked up to resist
further forward glide, and will therefore reduce internal rotation
through passive motion.”

The cut and paste function doesn’t seem
to be working for me but there is a lot more great information in
there.  I don’t like to pick and choose things that could be wrong with
your hip; like I said no one can really tell without examining you.  So
the above example isn’t so much what could be wrong with your hip but
more an example of the fact that the hip is a complex structure and you
should really have a professional look at it for you.  If that fails
then at least look beyond just the hip capsule, external and internal
rotators; as mentioned in this article.